Associate Justice Matthew L.M. Fletcher (Grand Traverse Band)

Matthew L.M. Fletcher (P61593) is professor of law at Michigan State University College of Law and director of the Indigenous Law and Policy Center. He is the chief justice of the Poarch Band of Creek Indians Supreme Court and also sits as an appellate judge for the Hoopa Valley Tribe, and the Nottawaseppi Huron Band of Potawatomi Indians. He is a member of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, located in Peshawbestown, Michigan. In 2010, Professor Fletcher was elected to the American Law Institute.

Professor Fletcher recently published the sixth edition of Cases and Materials on Federal Indian Law (Thomson West 2011) with David Getches, Charles Wilkinson, and Robert Williams, and American Indian Tribal Law (Aspen, March 2011), the first casebook for law students on tribal law. His book, The Return of the Eagle: The Legal History of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, is forthcoming from Michigan State University Press. In recent years, he has published American Indian Education: Counternarratives in Racism, Struggle, and the Law (Routledge 2008), and co-edited Facing the Future: The Indian Child Welfare Act at 30 with Wenona T. Singel and Kathryn E. Fort (Michigan State University Press 2009). Professor Fletcher has published articles with Arizona Law Review, Harvard Journal on Legislation, Hastings Law Journal, University of Colorado Law Review, Houston Law Review, Tulane Law Review, and many others. Finally, Professor Fletcher is the primary editor and author of the leading law blog in American Indian law and policy, Turtle Talk.

Professor Fletcher graduated from the University of Michigan Law School in 1997 and the University of Michigan in 1994. He has worked as a staff attorney for four Indian tribes: the Pascua Yaqui Tribe, the Hoopa Valley Tribe, the Suquamish Tribe, and the Grand Traverse Band, and he has been a consultant to the Seneca Nation of Indians Court of Appeals. He is married to Wenona Singel, a member of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, and they have two sons, Owen and Emmett.