Tribal Council

We are an 11-member Tribal Council, which is elected to staggered, three-year terms by Band citizens, that governs the Pokagon Band. Within the Tribal Council, the executive officers include a Chair, Vice-Chair, Secretary, and Treasurer.

 

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All Tribal Council agendas will appear below. Agendas will disappear after the corresponding meeting concludes. 

Upcoming Tribal Council Meetings:

Meeting Type Date Time Public Location Agenda
Special Session
12/03/2020
10:00 am
Open TEAMS 586-250-2691 Conference ID: 239 233 051# Agenda

Meeting minutes are found within the citizens only section of the Office of Tribal Council (Pokagon Citizens click here)

 

Current Tribal Council Members

Chair *Matt Wesaw
Vice Chair *Andrew Bennett
Secretary *Kelly Curran
Treasurer *John M. Morseau
Member at Large Mark Parrish
Member at Large Alex Wesaw
Member at Large Anita Morales
Member at Large Gary Morseau
Member at Large Steve Winchester
Member at Large Brandon Rapp
Elders Representative Colin Wesaw
Executive Secretary Melissa Rodriguez

*Denotes Executive Committee Member

 

The Congress shall have power to . . . regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the several states, and with the Indian tribes . . .

Article I, Section 8, United States Constitution
The sovereign governmental status of Indian tribes was recognized by foreign nations and the colonies prior to the formation of the Unites States and confirmed in the U.S. Constitution. Like state governments and foreign governments, Indian tribes have the inherent sovereign power to govern their people and their lands. Treaties between the United States and Indian tribes represent solemn commitments between governments. Through these treaties, Indian tribes transferred legal rights to millions of acres of tribal lands throughout the United States in exchange for guarantees that the federal government would protect the tribes' right to govern their own people, their homelands and preserve their ancient ways of life. Numerous decisions dating back to the earliest days of the U.S. Supreme Court consistently affirm the rule of law that Indian tribes retain their governmental status and powers unless expressly limited by treaty or by federal law.

 

Melissa Rodriguez Executive Secretary
melissa.rodriguez@pokagonband-nsn.gov

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